Welcome to English


Intent

KS3 and 4 English at Ashton CSC delivers an audacious and ambitious curriculum for all learners. It is driven by the National Curriculum, providing our students with a broad and balanced education and ensuring that all pupils, including those with SEND, are taught the necessary knowledge, skills and content through a sequentially and thematically linked curriculum. This ensures that students make connections between a wide range of forms, time periods, genres and ideas. A thoroughly researched thematic and sequential curriculum allows students to study canonical works of literature, alongside contemporary texts. This introduces students to the tradition of English literature through appropriately challenging texts – to develop all students' cultural capital, particularly the most disadvantaged and develop the whole child in their exploration of the human condition through the prism of literature. It allows non-fiction to be interleaved with fiction. It ensures students make links between reading and writing and do not see English as a series of disjointed skills, content and contexts. Together, these skills allow for success not just in exams, but allow for success throughout life.

Our key aims are to: 

  • Address gaps in pupils' knowledge on entry and those identified by ongoing formative and summative assessment.
  • Focus on the core knowledge that is needed for success in English scholarship.
  • Build on the skills that were crafted during KS2 to secure a seamless transition.
  • Build on prior knowledge to ensure our curriculum is challenging and progressive.
  • Ensure pupils can access a full curriculum from home when not able to attend school.
  • Foster a love of literature, encouraging students to read widely and independently.
  • Encourage pupils to read like writers and write like readers.
  • Design a curriculum which is thematically and sequentially linked. This will allow pupils to see links between knowledge, skills and ideas.
  • Develop discerning critical readers whose transferable analytical skills will allow them to interpret the ever more complex linguistic world around them.
  • Teach students to express themselves succinctly, confidently and creatively, according to purpose, with clear and correct use of English.
  • Inspire students to express themselves imaginatively, appropriately and effectively by using our rich and diverse English language.
  • Encourage students to become successful learners and responsible citizens.
  • Increase motivation by providing authentic, meaningful and relevant learning experiences.
  • Develop empathy.
  • Ensure that progress is sustained.  

Year 7

During year 7, students will study the following topics:

Fertile question: Is a villain born a villain?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • Character archetypes 
  • How to create a character 
  • How writers craft a character description 
  • What makes a villain?  
  • How to use description to create an atmosphere 

Full Text 

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone 

  • Miss Trunchbull in Matilda 
  • Miss Honey in Matilda 
  • A Monster Calls 
  • The Witches 
  • Magwitch in Great Expectations (pre-1914) 
  • The warden in Holes 
  • White Witch in Narnia 
  • Dracula (pre-1914) 
  • Miss Havisham (pre-1914) 
  • President Snow in The Hunger Games 
  • Gollum in Lord of the Rings 

Fertile question: Can a text capture real life experience and take you to another world?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • Identify how writers use descriptive devices to craft an effective setting 
  • How to use descriptive devices to carefully craft a setting 
  • How to use the first-person perspective in transactional writing to persuade 
  • How to use persuasive skills in a spoken language piece 
  • Travel blog on Khartoum by Michael Palin 
  • Delightful Dublin travel blog 
  • Taj Mahal travel blog 
  • 'You are my Taj Mahal' - Poem 
  • Extract from 'My Travels' by Karl Pilkington 
  • 'The Coliseum' By Edgar Allan Poe -Poem 
  • ‘An Email from Petra’  
  • ‘A letter from Italy’ 

Fertile question: How do writers use humour ?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • What is humour? 
  • Identify how writers use language and structure to create humour 
  • The conventions of a play 
  • Contextual and historical knowledge about Shakespeare and the Globe 

Full Text 

A Midsummer Night’s Dream  

  • Non-fiction articles about the context of the Globe theatre 
  • Comedy toolkit 
  • Comedy glossary 
  • Sonnet 130 
  • The Garden in her Face 
  • Women on Wheels – Jerome K 
  • Roald Dahl – Boy (extract) 

Fertile question: Is everyone responsible for each other?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • What is bias? 
  • What is empathy? 
  • How do writers use bias in non-fiction writing? 
  • How to identify different perspectives 
  • How to summarise 

Full Text 

Stone Cold  

  • Tramp (poem) 
  • Down and Out (poem) 
  • Charles Dickens – Nightwalks 
  • Street Life – article 
  • A story about the homeless – article 
  • A child becomes homeless – article 
  • Four personal accounts of homelessness (article) 
  • Hapless Homeless (blog) 

Year 8

During year 8, students will study the following topics:

Fertile question: Is nature a powerful force in our lives?

Fertile question: Do we still live in a marginalised world?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • Approaching a text as a critical analyst 
  • Developing empathy for characters and situations 
  • How to analyse language for meaning in fiction and poetry 
  • How poets use language and structure to embed real life experiences in their poetry 
  • How to use descriptive devices to carefully craft a setting and atmosphere 

 

Full Text 

Of Mice and Men 

  • The Blind Men and the Elephant 
  • An extract from The Great Gatsby 
  • To A Mouse – poem 
  • BBC News article - Who was Edward Colston and why is Bristol divided by his legacy? 
  • Hollow – poem 
  • Steinbeck’s letter to Miss Luce 
  • Newspaper article about Emmet Till 
  • Newspaper article about Emmet Till court case 

Fertile question: How does a writer build suspense/tension?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • What is gothic literature? 
  • What are the conventions of gothic literature? 
  • How do writers create a gothic setting? 
  • How can you apply these features to your own writing to create a gothic setting? 
  • What are key features of poetry that we can use for detailed analysis? 
  • Importance of the context of texts to contribute to your understanding.  
  • How is tension built in poetry? 
  • How is mood created in poetry? 
  • Frankenstein  
  • The Highwayman 
  • The Woman in Black 
  • Hamlet 
  • The Laboratory  
  • Porphyria’s Lover 
  • Do ghosts exist?  Non-fiction article. 

Fertile question: Do stories from the past stand the text of time?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • Understand how language has changed over time and what has influenced this.  
  • Form opinions and justify these.  
  • Understand how to effectively evaluate a text in relation to a statement.  
  • Consider whether texts from the past still bear relevance today? 
  • Understand how traditions and history shape our lives.  
  • What are morals and how do these shape us as people?  
  • Can you write persuasively? 
  • Beowulf  
  • Prodigal Son 
  • Extracts from The Canterbury Tales 
  • Chaucer’s Pilgrims 
  • The Pardoner’s Tale 

Fertile question: Is a woman capable of corrupting a man?

Fertile question: Can you ever be too ambitious?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • What are structural devices? 
  • What are the effects of structural devices? 
  • How does setting effect the structure of a play? 
  • What is evaluation and how to evaluate a statement 
  • What is the role of women in an Jacobean setting? 
  • How to use tone and intonation in a spoken language presentation 

Full Text 

Macbeth 

  • Non-fiction guardian article (21st century) 
  • The Lancashire Witches (Duffy poem) 
  • Non-fiction ‘Witchcraft texts’ (19th and 21st century)  

Year 9

During year 9, students will study the following topics:

Fertile question: Are we heading towards a dystopian future?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • To identify and interpret writers’ attitudes in non-fiction texts 
  • To identify the features of dystopian society 
  • How to carefully craft a piece of creative writing by “showing not telling” the reader 
  • Extract from The Hunger Games 
  • Extract from The Handmaid’s Tale 
  • Extract from The Children of Men 
  • Article about the use of CCTV in the UK 
  • Article about the lack of privacy around the use of CCTV in the UK 
  • Article about prisons pre-1914 
  • Article about prisons in the 21st Century 
  • Extracts from 1984 
  • Extract from Harrison Bergeron 
  • Greta Thunberg speech at the Climate Actions Summit 2019 

Fertile question: Do aliens really exist?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • To identify different types of genre/form within non-fiction texts. 
  • To identify the features of the science-fiction genre  
  • To explore how tension can be built through language 
  • To understand how to form an opinion and evaluate a text 
  • To understand how to present a broad and balanced argument   
  • Fictional extract - War of the Worlds by HG Wells 
  • Non-Fiction article about UFO sceptics  
  • Non-Fiction article about UFO sightings  
  • Fictional extract - A Sound of Thunder by Ray Bradbury  
  • Non-Fiction article about artificial intelligence  
  • Fictional extract - There will come Soft Rains by Ray Bradbury  
  • Non-Fiction article about artificial intelligence 

Fertile question: Do we still live in classless society?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • How is stage direction used in a play to portray meaning? 
  • To understand and empathise with those held back by their social setting 
  • To develop an understanding of empathy and sympathy for characters and their situations 
  • To be able to evaluate a statement 
  • To explore how tension can be built through language and structure  
  • To use descriptive devices to capture the atmosphere within a social setting 

Full Text 

Blood Brothers 

  • Non-fiction article on Margaret Thatcher 
  • Fictional extract - Les Misérables by Victor Hugo  
  • Non-fiction article on Ragged Schools  
  • Fictional extract – Hard Times by Charles Dickens  
  • Non-fiction speech by Margaret Thatcher 

Fertile question: Can text ever really capture someone’s feelings or experiences?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • To understand the effect of sophisticated structural devices  
  • To appreciate shifts in perspective/narrator 
  • How poets use form and structure to craft meaning 
  • To develop our understanding of empathy and how this can be grounded to the context from which war poetry was written 
  • To develop understanding of non-fiction by empathising with the writer, and their subject(s) 
  • To understand how character contrasts can shape perception 
  • To understand the importance of editing and redrafting creative writing 
  • Poem: Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred Lord Tennyson 
  • Non-fiction letter by Wilfred Owen 
  • Poem: Exposure by Wilfred Owen 
  • Poem: Bayonet Charge by Ted Hughes 
  • Non-fiction autobiography – Extract from American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History by Chris Kyle with Scott McEwen and Jim DeFelice. 
  • Poem: War Photographer by Carol Ann Duffy  
  • Poem: Remains by Simon Armitage  
  • Film Documentary – They Shall not Grow old by Peter Jackson  
  • Fictional extract – Birdsong by Sabastian Faulks   
  • Fictional extract – Cavalry Battle (1914) by Frederic Coleman 
  • Fictional extract – The Charge of the Light Brigade narrative (1854) by William Howard Russell 

Year 10

During year 10, students will study the following topics:

Fertile question: Love or hate? Which is the most powerful emotion?

Fertile question: Do we control our own lives or does fate play a part?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • Understand the plot, themes and key characters in Romeo and Juliet 
  • How does love and hate drive the play and the plot? 
  • How is fate used in the play to build tension between scenes and characters? 
  • To understand writers’ perspectives within a non-fiction article 
  • How to use figurative language in an article to articulate perspective 
  • How to evaluate a statement and articulate an opinion about the statement, formed by relevant evidence in a text 
  • How poet’s use language, form and structure to create meaning in their poem 

Full Text 

Romeo and Juliet 

  • The Three Fates Story (Greek Myth)   
  • The old Greek story of the wealthy man the Three Fates   

Fertile question: Do we live in man’s world?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

    • Understand the plot, themes and key characters in Romeo and Juliet 
    • How does love and hate drive the play and the plot? 
    • How is fate used in the play to build tension between scenes and characters? 
    • To understand writers’ perspectives within a non-fiction article 
    • How to use figurative language in an article to articulate perspective 
    • How to evaluate a statement and articulate an opinion about the statement, formed by relevant evidence in a text 
    • How poet’s use language, form and structure to create meaning in their poem 

Full Text 

An Inspector Calls 

  • Online article – Marriage in the Elizabethan Era   
  • A transcript of Emma Watson’s speech in UN in 2014. The HeforShe campaign   
  • Article from the Punch, titled ‘The Best Sewing Machine’  
  • Article from the Guardian – Mental Health: One in four young women struggling  
  • Article -Escaping the Madhouse, by Nellie Bly   
  • Scenes of Romeo and Juliet 

Fertile question: What creates inequality?

Fertile question: Can a person change?

Core Knowledge 

Interleaved Texts 

  • How to infer meaning in a range of texts and explain inference in a written response 
  • How to compare perspectives of writers across multiple texts 
  • How power is used in a range of anthology poems 
  • How to analyse language, form and structure for meaning in a range of seen and unseen poetry 

Full Text 

A Christmas Carol 

  • Speech Transcript – Lord Shaftesbury talking at the houses of Parliament in 1842 about Child Labour  
  • BBC article - India’s Hidden Shame (Child Labour)  
  • Extract from Roll of Thunder Hear my Cry – Mildred D Taylor   
  • Online article –Thomas Malthus   
  • Article – A visit to the workhouses- Charles Dickens   
  • British Library Article – Dickens and Christianity 
  • Scenes of Romeo and Juliet 
  • Scenes of An Inspector Calls 

Year 11

Fertile question: Are the qualities virtue and honour something to be admired?

Fertile question: Is nature more powerful than man?

Fertile question: Appearance versus reality: is there truth in memory?

Fertile question: How does everything connect?

During Y11, students will revisit and revise key GCSE texts, as well as studying a wide range of literary fiction extracts and non-fiction texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st century, in order to prepare them for GCSE exams. During this time, teachers will constantly and freely adapt their teaching to the needs of the individual classes and individual learners to ensure areas for development and gaps are addressed in order to ensure their students achieve their full potential.

Resources

English GCSE Syllabus


Mrs C. Murray

Head of Department & Whole School Leader of Literacy

Miss A. Horton

Second in Department

Miss E. Crook

Miss S. Kaur

Teacher of English

Mrs M. Pilkington

Assistant Headteacher & Teacher of English

Mrs J. Robinson

Teacher of English

Mr D. Thomas

Teacher of English


English

© Copyright 2014–2021 Ashton Community Science College